Preparing for a Pre Purchase

You have finally agreed on a selling price, “Done the Deal”, and sold your house.  All that is left is the Pre Purchase Timber Pest Inspection to be carried out by the purchaser’s pest inspector.  Unfortunately, the report is not good. The inspector has found numerous conducive conditions for termites which require rectification.  The purchaser then comes back to you with a reduced offer, or worse still, the inspector finds live termites and the purchaser pulls out of the contract.

 

Don’t let this happen to you – Be Prepared

 

Have a Pre Sale Inspection by a fully independent pest control inspector – he will pick up any termite issues which can then be rectified prior to the purchaser’s inspection – no surprises – no loss of sale.

Common issues picked up by Termite Inspectors

Access

Stored goods, dense foliage, rubbish or furniture against internal or external walls, if the inspector can’t visually inspect any areas he will comment on this and recommend a further inspection, at an additional cost, when these areas are cleared.

What you can do

Ensure all internal and external walls are cleared for inspection.

Insulation

If you have foil insulation in the roof, the inspector will request a current electrical safety certificate before entering the roof for inspection, if this certificate is not available he will recommend a further inspection, at an additional cost, when the certificate is provided.

What you can do

Ensure a current electrical safety certificate is available.

Termite Management

If there is a current termite management system installed or if you have a warranty or insurance policy for termite infestations.

What you can do

Provide all paperwork.

Previous Termite Damage

If the house has had a previous termite infestation or had termite damage repaired.

What you can do

Have all inspection, treatment and warranty paperwork available for the inspector.  If termite damage has been repaired, have a report from a builder to ascertain all repairs have been completed.

Wood Rot

Fences, landscaping timbers and timber retaining walls can attract termites, if these conditions are found then the inspector will advise removal/replacement with non-susceptible material.

What you can do

Replace all timber showing evidence of wood rot.

Drainage

Poor drainage, especially, in or into the subfloor or against the external walls, increases the likelihood of termite attack.

What you can do

Ensure all drainage issues are rectified.

Water Leaks

Especially in, or into, the subfloor or against the external walls, increases the likelihood of termite attack.  Leaking showers or leaks from other ‘wet areas’ also increase the likelihood of concealed termite attack.

What you can do

Fix dripping external taps. Repair leaking gutters and broken down pipes. Seal leaking showers.

Hot Water services & Air Conditioning units

These release water alongside or near to building walls which need to be connected to a drain as the resulting wet area is highly conducive to termites. If this is not possible, the water needs to be piped several meters away from the building as the resulting wet area is highly conducive to termites.

What you can do

Ensure no water drips against the external wall from these appliances.

Weep holes in external walls

It is very important that soil, lawn, concrete paths or pavers do not cover the weep holes. They should be clean and free flowing. Covering the weep holes in part or in whole may allow undetected termite entry.

What you can do

Ensure all weep holes are clear.

Slab edge

Some houses are built with the slab edge exposed, this allows visual inspection of the slab edge for evidence of termite leads.

What you can do

Ensure all slab edges are kept clear for inspection.